Review: The Glass Thief

The Lands of G'desh

The Glass Thief is a fun action fantasy story which goes from sword and board of a common thief trying to pay off a debt, to the high fantasy of a world altering artifact plagued by the attention of the undead. The story is set up in three acts, whether intentional or not, where the story fundamentally changes what it is. These alterations feel a bit like the life cycle of a Caterpillar, and by the end you have a butterfly. Soaked in tears.

The story focuses on a few characters, but at the heart is Del Kanadis, a thief. He has a debt band, a ring around his arm to remind him he must do the bidding of King Adius. Del is well thought out, witty, and has interesting quirks: he won’t kill, and he is afraid of heights. Del grows through his discovery of self and friends. It’s 

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Upside Down

I’m upside down
My feet in the air,
Head on the ground.
Wasn’t supposed to be this way.
Didn’t realize I was that attached.
Didn’t see she was my center.

Now I’m detached,
Free falling with no clue
What to do, to chase or wait?
But to give utterance is villainy
For I am the villain, I am a destroyer
And I am destroyed.

You were my glue. You kept me together. Then you dissolved, and you dissolved me with you, because I made you my world.

And it doesn’t make sense.
I screwed myself again.
And it’s empty.
Upside down.
Alone.

Support The Glass Thief’s Thunderclap —

A DEBT IS OWED. Del Kanadis–indentured thief to the King of Fires–desires freedom above all else. When given the opportunity to repay his debt with a single job, he begrudgingly accepts, believing it to be a fool’s errand. His task: infiltrate a secluded village rumoured to hold a relic capable of defeating the Fire King’s […]

via Support The Glass Thief’s Thunderclap —

Men’s Retreat and Addiction

I’m Christian. I try to be fairly vocal about it. I do know I’m still a sinner.

This weekend I’m helping with a men’s retreat. I spent today literally bearing a cross (onto a truck), along with numerous beams, boxes, and bins. I love alliteration.

As I’m ready for this exhausting weekend, I’m already nearly tapped. On top of that, next weekend I leave for Guatemala. Just ordered our craft projects. Should be fun.

The weekend after we get back from Guatemala I’m doing something I meant to do a long time ago. I firmly believe that if you see something and you feel called to it, and it’s meant to happen, eventually God gets tired of waiting and puts it in front of you. If you keep ignoring it, eventually you get swallowed by a fish the size of whales to stew for three days.

Christmas two years ago there was an addiction center that was looking for donations. I didn’t have the money as the holidays are horrible for my paycheck. However, I have time I can give, and I asked if they were also looking for volunteers. The guy said of course. I never went. I am a wretched sinner, but God is a loving God.

So today, mindlessly skimming Facebook because that is all the energy I have, I saw our church is having a football party at the addiction facility. The idea is to reach out to these individuals and eventually form relationships over several visits. Chances are they have few friends who understand their desire to get clean, so we want to give them a better foundation. Or something.

I apologize for how horribly written this post is. I’m going to eat dinner now. I’m half dead. Nap time. Peace!

All Children Should Read

Check out their site and get them some pics of children reading! Preferably your children or closely related children who know you. Don’t like chill across the street from a school and take stalker pics.

Joshua Robertson

14536940_10155111004925931_1396212729_o“The school year has begun and nearly 50 million children in the U.S. have returned to class. Roughly 3.5 million children have started school for the first time. Unfortunately, at least a third, more than 1 million, of these children will enter kindergarten without either the cognitive or social-emotional skills necessary to start to learn. Research has shown that children who start school at such a disadvantage struggle to catch up – they are more likely to fail third grade reading tests, and less likely to graduate from high school. Many of these children will grow up to live in poverty.” …more…


We need your help to destroy these roadblocks and change our children’s future. We only have 6 short days left to collect images for a promotional video to support Early Childhood Literacy. Catch your kids reading by October 10th and send the photo to info@goblinhorde.com.

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Sun Tzu and Pokemon

Obsession you say? Nonsense I say!

Today I convinced my coworker to play the Pokemon TCG with me. I have a hoopa deck that I’ve played several times online, but I haven’t used the physical deck. He worked off the volcanion deck.

hoopa-unbound.jpg

Hoopa Unbound. He’s a scary purple genie

I sat there with a deck I knew. I had my primary strategies, the cards I needed and would try for, and I felt confident. I felt there was no way I could lose.

For whatever reason in that moment I understood the meta of what I was doing. Not the acronym people use, where META means Most Effective Tactic Available. At that moment I was watching the flow of competition as if I was outside of the moment. It felt as weird as it sounds.

My opponent surely felt he could win, especially with the knowledge my 4 year old nephew crushed me. He had a deck that was built to face off against mine, even if he didn’t know what exactly was in it. To be honest, aside from knowing it was a fire and steel deck, I didn’t know what was in it.

Know yourself, and you will win half your battles. Know yourself and your enemy and you will win all of your battles.

As the competition went on, I had my strategies before me. I worked through the cards I usually did, even though I had some energy issues. I had to try something new, and it paid off. My opponent made his moves as he learned the deck.

Then it reached a point where I knew how the game ended. It would still be five or six moves until the finale, but as he had two major Pokemon set up, I had two major Pokemon set up, I saw the only path which made sense. I would take out his active Pokemon. He would then take out mine. Our two final hopes would be on the field, with our little people waiting in reserve.

I needed to win a coin toss. I get that you may not understand everything leading up to this, but it would come down to two powerful beings trying to take each other out, and if I could win a coin toss, I won the game. If I lost the coin toss, I lost the game. It would still be three turns after that coin toss, but the results would be inevitable.

It played out the way I expected it to, and we were left with the coin toss. I flipped and looked at the ceiling. In that moment I was both victorious and defeated. I looked down. Heads. I needed heads.

He tried valiantly with his final two Pokemon, but I ran through them in two turns, and the game was over.

Both sides believe they can win a conflict, or they wouldn’t be in conflict. Sometimes it’s delusional or ridiculous defiance, but usually there’s a shot. There is also generally a key moment, and often times the farsighted strategist will see it. They will see the events leading up to that moment, they will recognize that moment, and they will comprehend that winning or losing that one moment dictates the course of everything else to come.

This is Helm’s Deep. It’s Normandy. It’s a thousand other battles, real and fantastic. While not as cut and dry, they are the defining points that a loss would mean total defeat, and victory would mean the march continued.

In this moment of playing a children’s game, I gleaned all of this. It’s amazing what we can learn, even in the simplest of things.